Gravy undergoes a Renovation

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As many of you know, last spring my fuel tank went bad.  Last sum­mer I ran the boat with a 12 gal­lon portable fuel tank.  There were many trips to the fuel dock as 12 gal­lons of gas was enough for two trips, but not enough for two trips and peace of mind.

Fur­ther inspec­tion revealed that the prob­lems were more sig­nif­i­cant than a punky fuel tank.  Not only was the fuel tank con­t­a­m­i­nat­ed, the entire deck of the boat was sat­u­rat­ed with water and the back­bone of the hull, the stringers were rot­ted.  Suf­fice it to say, the repairs are cost­ing the amount a semes­ter’s tuition at a pri­vate col­lege.

Bri­an Ack­ell from Bri­an’s Out­boards is rebuild­ing the innards of the hull (almost from scratch) with light­weight core mate­ri­als and epox­ies.  I’m hop­ing this gains us an inch or so in draft, enabling the Gravy to get in just a bit more shal­low waters.

I’ll keep updat­ing with pic­tures as progress con­tin­ues.

Looking forward to a great season of fishing the shallow waters in a renewed boat.

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